Training schedule for beginner runners

Welcome. Whether you are a beginner or experienced runner a training schedule will help you stay on top of your goals and track your progress. Depending on how quickly you want to reach your goal it is a good idea to write down a physical reminder of how to progress to reach your goal, like a small personal strategy.

To run a 5k race we recommend giving yourself 6-8 weeks to slowly build up your confidence, endurance, strength, and power. Running 3 times per week should be sufficient enough to give you time in between to recover and do other forms of exercises. If you haven’t yet, also read our 5k beginner runner guide here.

Here is our sample 6-week training schedule which includes 3 running training per week, plus one day for conditional training in a gym and a yoga session for recovery. You can, of course, individualise this schedule to meet your needs and time availability.

 

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Week 1

1 Km

rest

1 Km

gym

rest

1.5 Km

Yoga

Week 2

1.5 Km

rest

2 Km

gym

rest

2.5 Km

Yoga

Week 3

2.5 Km

rest

3 Km

gym

rest

3 Km

Yoga

Week 4

3.5 Km

rest

3.5 Km

gym

rest

4 Km

Yoga

Week 5

4 Km

rest

4 Km

gym

rest

4.5 Km

Yoga

Week 6

4.5 Km

rest

5 Km

gym

rest

5 km

Yoga

 

For any of the days feel free to split the runs up, do 1 Km at a time then take a 1-2 minutes rest to catch your breath or to power walk. For example, you can split the week 1 Sunday’s 1.5 Km into 2 parts by doing 1.25 Km at a time, or into three parts by doing 2x 1Km and then 500m run or 5x 100m sprints. With sprints in between rounds or within the training overall, you will be able to practice breath control, endurance, and it will help with increasing your speed. Similarly, you can split up any of the runs for the entire 6-week training into smaller bits to get used to running the distance but not all at once.

 

As a beginner runner, also, don’t focus on your running time, rather work on your technique. Humans are built to run. It's one of our most natural movements. But, it is also a skill you need to learn and develop. Learn to run well before you learn to run far and fast. It is better to build your form to feel comfortable with your pace instead of always pushing hard, chasing time or distance and getting exhausted. Not running with proper technique may end up with you getting hurt and possibly discouraged from running in the future.

 

So, go on and write down your schedule! It is important to be realistic, you know yourself the best and if you know you won’t be able to fit in 3 runs plus gym and yoga each week, split it up even more. Do two runs per week and see how you go about gym and yoga. It might take you longer, but as we said before, it is more important to learn at a comfortable pace than to constantly push hard and feel awful and demotivated afterwards.

Happy running!


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